Monday, November 07, 2016

Moving Past Picking the Low-Hanging Fruit

Here's something that I wrote back in 2008, together with Rachel Brumberg, Danny Mishkin, and David Wolkin for the "Mentor's Voice" column of the (now defunct) Leadership Institute for Congregational Educators


Anyone who has been involved in a change initiative has probably encountered the phrase “low hanging fruit,” those targets or goals which are easily achievable and which do not require a lot of effort. There are any number of reasons why it is advantageous to focus change efforts on low hanging fruit at the outset.  But what then? 

At Congregation Emanu-El of the City of New York, in a series of departmental retreats, we identified new challenges that arise as low-hanging fruit is picked, and how we might respond to those challenges.  Here is a summary of the thoughts of our Department of Lifelong Learning full-time staff:

1. What do we mean by “low-hanging fruit?”
  • Things that require little work and can be done easily
  • Things that can be successful more quickly (even if a lot of work)
  • Things for which it is obvious what success would look like
  • Things that may not require systemic change – can stand alone, can be handled departmentally and autonomously, are perhaps less threatening or non-threatening
2. Why focus on low-hanging fruit at the start?
  • To build confidence and trust in leadership & change process though early successes
  • To respond to the hunger for change and for deliverables – start with a bang!
  • To create buy-in and to build trust among stakeholders – people want to see results!
  • To build the morale of the team
3. What new challenges arise as low-hanging fruit is picked?
When the low hanging fruit is used up –  what then?  How will we know what to tackle next?  How can we prepare for future challenges? 
  • There is the possibility of addressing symptoms but not causes. As a result, the changes we make may only be superficial and the solutions may only work for a limited duration. 
  • Any new interventions or program changes require systems, structures, and staffing that must be coordinated, managed, and supervised -- they don’t run themselves!  Managing the increased workload resulting from new initiatives, and developing new systems and procedures, can become so time consuming that no further initiatives can be developed.
  • We don’t necessarily learn the skills (or help others learn the skills) that will enable us to tackle more challenging problems or projects.
  • Because this work doesn’t require people to get out of their comfort zones, it does not require us to create an environment in which conflict and debate is effectively managed and resolved.
  • The expectation can be developed that we will continue making positive change at the same pace, even though further changes would be more challenging to institute.
  • If all the work done is done internally and departmentally, it does not build a collaborative environment or shared sense of accountability.  Therefore, changes may not develop the deep roots that enable them to endure beyond the efforts of the change-makers.
4. What should we do to respond to these challenges?
  • Be willing to shake the tree!  Take risks!
  • Climb the tree: Think strategically and long-term. Set priorities that will have deep impact and stick to them.  Build consensus and shared accountability around these priorities. Be strong and resolute in face of opposition. Learn to say “no” by sticking to our priorities.
  • Focus on infrastructure and build systems.  Use what we have learned so far to develop procedures and routines to handle day-to-day tasks – especially high urgency, low importance and low priority items.
  • Broaden and deepen our relationships with members of the community (including families, faculty, and staff in other departments).  Provide volunteers with real responsibilities, an active voice, and the ability to directly impact the program. Continue to build and deepen buy-in among our stakeholders, not merely as lip service, but because we see their participation as critical to the long-term success of the endeavor.
  • Clarify our expectations (for participation, achievement, and so on) and publicize them widely.  Where our language is vague, clarify what we really mean.  Establish a culture of commitment and responsibility.
  • Think about our legacy – what do we want things to look like once we are gone, and how can we make our changes stick?

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